The Compendium Of Anambra State - Light Of The Nation At 25 (My Compilation) TrendyVoice

10 April 2017

The Compendium Of Anambra State - Light Of The Nation At 25 (My Compilation)






Anambra At 25 - A Compendium


My Compilation On Anambra State At 25 ( A Compendium):
 (A Brief History).

 Anambra is a state in southeastern Nigeria. Its name is an anglicized version of the original 'Oma Mbala', the native name of the Anambra River. The capital and seat of government is Awka. Onitsha, Nnewi, and Ekwulobia are the biggest commercial and industrial cities respectively. The state's theme is "Light Of The Nation".

Boundaries are formed by Delta State to the west, Imo State and Rivers State to the south, Enugu State to the east and Kogi State to the north. The origin of the name is derived from the Anambra River (Omambala) which is a tributary of the River Niger.
The indigenous ethnic group in Anambra state are the Igbo (98% of population) and a small population of Igala (2% of the population) who live mainly in the north-western part of the state.
Anambra is the eighth most populated state in the Federal Republic of Nigeria and the second most densely populated state in Nigeria after Lagos State. The stretch of more than 45 km between Oba and Amorka contains a cluster of numerous thickly populated villages and small towns giving the area an estimated average density of 1,500–2,000 persons per square kilometre.

History And Origin Of Some Anambra Towns:

A lot of Anambra people do not know their history. Almost all Anambra people, parts of Delta and parts Enugu peoplE.Most of the population of Anambra State are members of the enterprising Igbo ethnic group who are renowned for their resoucefulness and spirit of entrepreneurship. The Anambra Igbo are ubiquitous and can be found in all nooks and cranies of Nigeria, as well as in virtually every region of the world.


NRI KINGDOM is the oldest Kingdom in Nigeria. It was founded around 900AD by the progenitor, Eri, the son of Gad. According to biblicalaccounts, Jacob had Leah as his wife who begot four sons for him. When Leah noticed she had passed child-bearing age, she gave her maid – servant, Zilpah to Jacob to wife, and through Zilpah he had a son named Gad. Gad then bigot Eri, who later formed a clan known as Erites vide Genesis Chapter 30 verse 9; 46 verse 16 and Numbers chapter 26 verses 15-19. Eri was therefore amongst the twelve tribes of Israel via Gad.

During their stay in Egypt Eri became the high priest and spiritual adviser to Pharaoh Teti, the fifth dynastic king of Egypt around 2400 BC.
Dim-Chukwuemeka-Odumegwu-Ojukwu
Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu

During the Exodus, which marked the beginning of the mass movement of the tribes of Israel, the tribe of Eri was amongst the tribe that left Egypt following the injunction from God to the Israelites (see Deuteronomy chapter 28 verses 58 – 68). Some of these tribes founded settlements in the southern part of Sudan, where they established the “Nok” culture, which is similar to that of other (sun Cult) culture, like Nri, Fiji, Samoa, and Jukun in the Northern part of Nigeria and elsewhere. But others who could not remain in the Southern Sudan traveled further South, some branched off to Jukun, in Northern part of Nigeria, others continued and arrived at the confluence of Rivers Niger and Anambara known as “Ezu-na-Ọmambala” and settled there while some veered off to the Island of Fiji in the South Pacific Ocean. An intelligence report notes that the Fijians have the same sun culture with the people of Nri.

When Eri arrived at the confluence of “Ezu-na-Ọmambala” he had two wives, namely Nneamakụ and Oboli, Nneamakụ begot five children, namely (a) Nrifikwuanịm-Menri being the first son (b) Agụlụ (c) Ogbodudu (d) Onogu and (e) Iguedo the only daughter. Oboli begot Ọnọja, the only son who founded the Ịgala Kingdom in Kogi State. Meanwhile, Nri-Ifikwuanịm begot Agụkwu Nri, Enugwu-Ukwu, Enugwu-Agidi, Nọfịa, and Amọbia, while his brother Ogbodudu who later became Nrinaoke N’Ogbodudu had founded the Diodo Dynasty, while his brother Ezikannebo founded Akamkpịsị and Amanuke. Onogu Begot Ịgbariam, while Iguedo, the only daughter, begot Ogbunike, Ọkuzu, Nando, Ụmụleri, and Nteje, Known today as Ụmụ-Iguedo clan, while the former are better known as Ụmụ-Nri clan. According to Nri Oral tradition recently substantiated by archaeological findings of Ọraeri/Igbo-Ukwu objects, the unification of Agukwu, Diodo, and Akamkpịsị was enacted constitutionally during the beginning of reign of Nribụife (AD 1159 – 1252) who was the first Eze Nri to observe the Ịgụ-Arọ Festival as a pan – Igbo affair in 1160AD (Prof. M.A. Ọnwụejeọgwu 2003).

Prof. Chuba Okadigbo 

                                                                    Prof. Chuba Okadigbo


Some Onicha people, before Eze Chima's exodus, had left Benin to establish other towns like Issele Ukwu, Ebu, Kwale, Ezzi, Onicha-Ukwu, Okpanam, Asaba(originally called "Araba"wink and some other towns of Benin orientation that had been established before the Ezechima's exodus from Benin.. It was these settlements that habored Obi Ohime/Ezechima when he and his family fled from Benin. The migration from Benin to Onicha Mmili took many years, towns of Onicha-Olona and Onicha-Ugbo were established by Onicha people who felt reluctant to continue and follow Obi Ohime to Onicha-mmili.

ESTABLISHMENT OF ONICHA-MMILI AND HER RULING DYNASTY:

Obi Ohime or Eze Chima, having been told that he could not enter Onicha, stayed for a long time in Obio with his family and relatives before he died. After he died, his relatives decided to continue with their migration to establish Onicha. The qualification for whom shall be crowned king was conditioned upon who shall sound ancient rhythms on a wooden Ufie. Traditionally, Ufie cannot be owned or be sounded/beaten by a person whose father is still alive. The contestants to the throne having just lost their father, had no ufie, however, Oreze Obi, had carved one which he hid under the boat and sounded first upon getting to Onicha whilst his siblings were busy looking for the appropriate wood to cut for the Ufie.

The contestants to the throne were Oreze, Ukpali, Agbor Chima, Ekensu(Aboh Chima), Obio, Obamkpa and Isele. All these men were all children of Eze Chima. This is very important because I have read some articles being written about "non-royal and royal" Onitsha families by people who are very ignorant of our history. Dei Ogbuevi was uterine brother of Eze Chima and was therefore not excluded from Onicha kingship unlike the children of Eze Chima outlined above. That is why any Dei descendant can still aspire to the Oncha throne, unlike the descendants of the children of Eze Chima that contested the throne. Rather than contest the election of their sibling, they resolved to emigrate from Onicha and go back to "Enu Ani" to establish their own clans. Thus Obamkpa, left to establish Obamkpa town. Umuasele, Iyiawu and Umu Odimegwu Gbuagwu villages are all descended from Obamkpa. Ukpali went to found Agbor and Ekensu went to found Aboh. After, Ojedi's sacrifice of her life tosave Onicha, her father Dei, left Umudei village to reside with his nephew Ukpali who had founded Aboh town(because then, it was a taboo for a child to die before the parents.) Whilst at Aboh, Dei had more children, who just like their Aboh relatives, became very wealthy by fishermen and traders. These children of Dei in Aboh, whenever they came to Onicha to trade and market their wares, would spend some days with their relatives at Umudei village. Some later settled at Umudei after exchanging marital vows with other Onicha people and founded the "Ogbe Onira" clan in Umudei village, a very spiritual, mystical and tough clan. The term "Aboh Rika" is now being erroneously applied to all Umu Dei people, but this is historically incorrect. It was originally used for Ogbe Onira clan because of their "Dei-Aboh" roots. Till date, our relatives from Aboh town are saluted with "Abohrika". It literarily means Aboh predominates! One always sees that pride wherever children of Eze Chima are founded. < /U>

When Dei later left Aboh, he went and founded Oguta town in Imo State and till date, only descendants of Dei can assume the throne of Oguta town. In Oguta today, the Umudei Village exists. Traditionally, whenever, the Obi of Oguta visited Onicha-Mmili, he would first go to the Diokpa of Umudei village who would then accompany him to the Obi of Onicha.

THE NINE CLANS OF ONICHA:EBO ITENANI:
Onicha is made up of nine clans: the Umu-Ezechima Clan, Ugwu na Obamkpa Clan; Awada Clan; Ubulu na Ikem Clan;Ulutu Clan;Ubene Clan(Umu Okwulinye);Ogbolieke Clan; Obior Clan; and Agbanute Clan. 

The city of Onitsha was founded by Igbo group from Arochukwu under the leadership of Eze Chima. People of Arochukwu founded many other communities both within and outside Igboland. Arochukwu played a significant role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade of the 1600-1800 AD. The Aro confederacy (Aro slave traders) scattered throughout the hinterlands of the Igbo nation, in coalition with several Igbo tribal leaders orchestrated the sale of over 4 million Igbo sons and daughters during the transatlantic slave trade. Many Igbo slaves who were shipped from the slave outposts in Calabar and Bonny to Europe and the Americas, were first assembled in Arochukwu,and then transported to Calabar or Bonny via the Aro Blue River which pours into the Atlantic ocean. Most Igbo slaves were shipped to North Carolina and Virginia, in the United States. Igbo slaves were also shipped to the Caribbean Islands of Jamaica, Haiti, and Cuba.
Ogidi has a very rich history that dates over 450 years. The founding father of the town, Ezechumagha (born c.1550) married Anum-Ubosi and they had a son in 1580 named Inwelle. Inwelle married and had a son in 1611 named Ogidi (meaning strong pillar because he was a great warrior). Ogidi had 2 wives: (i) Duaja whose children were Akanano, Uru, Ezinkwo, Umu-Udo, and Ama-Okwu; and (ii) Amalanyia whose children were Ikenga, Nne Ogidi, Uruagu and Achalla Ogidi. After the migration of five of his children, the remaining four sons (Akanano, Uru, Ezinkwo and Ikenga) formed the present Ebo Ino (four quarters) of Ogidi.

History has it that Umu-Udo migrated to present day Umunya (in Oyi Local Government of Anambra State). Ama-Okwu was either sold off into slavery or got integrated into other parts of Ogidi, especially Odida in Ikenga. Nne Ogidi was married off to Agulu and is a thriving village in Agulu. Uruagu migrated and settled in Nnewi although present day Uruagu Nnewi people deny any claim with Ogidi, and Achalla Ogidi (a great elephant hunter) migrated to present day Okija (derived from Oka Ije Achalla Ogidi).

Of the four sons who stayed back in Ogidi, Akanano had 2 wives. The first wife had Ire and Abo, while the second had Ezi-Ogidi and Umuru. Uru (born c.1643) had 8 children: Ntukwulu, Ajilija, Adazi, Umudoma, Uru Ezealo, Uro Oji, Umu Anugwo, and Ogwugwuagu. Ezinkwo had 2 sons: (a) Ogidi-Ani who had Ogidi-Anu Ukwu and Ogidi-Ani Etiti; and (b) Nkwelle Ogidi who had Ezinkwelle and Uru Owelle. Ikenga had 2 wives: (a) Aghaluji Ejebe Ogu who had Obodo Okwe and Anugwo; and (b) Ezenebo who had Nanri and Odida.
Dora Nkem Akunyili 
Prof. Dora Nkem Akunyili (OFR)
She died in an India hospital on 7 June 2014 after a battle with Cancer

Awka is one of the oldest settlements in Igboland established at the centre of the Nri civilization which produced the earliest documented bronze works in Sub-Saharan Africa around 800 AD and was the cradle of Igbo civilization.

The earliest settlers of Awka were the Ifiteana people which translates into people who sprouted from the earth. They were farmers, hunters, and skilled iron workers who lived on the banks of the Ogwugwu stream in what is now known as Nkwelle ward of Awka.

The deity of the Ifiteana was known as Okika-na-ube or the god pre-eminent with the spear and the Ifiteana were known as Umu-Okanube or “worshippers of Okanube”, which evenutally became shortened to Umu-Oka and eventually Oka and its angicized version "Awka".

In ancient times, Awka was populated by elephants with a section of the town named Ama-enyi (haunt of elephants) and a pond Iyi-Enyi where the elephants used to gather to drink. The elephants were hunted for their prized ivory tusks (okike) which was kept as a symbol to the god Okanube in every Awka home with hunting medicine stored in the hollow of the tusk.

Over time, the town become famous for metal working of a high level and its blacksmiths were prized throughout the region for making farming implements, Dane guns and ceremonial items such as Oji (staff of mystical power) and Ngwuagilija (staff of Ozo men).

In pre-colonial days Awka also became famous as the home of the Agbala Oracle a deity that was said to be a daughter of the great Long Juju shrine of Arochukwu. The Agbala Oracle (which Chinua Achebe drew on for inspiration in his book Things Fall Apart[3]) was consulted to resolve disputes far and wide until it was finally destroyed by colonial authorities in the early part of the 20th century.

Before the inception of British rule, Awka was governed by titled men known as Ozo and Ndichie who were accomplished individuals in the community. They held general meetings or Izu Awka either at the residence of the oldest man (Otochal Awka) or at a place designated by him. He was the Nne Uzu or master blacksmith, whether he knew the trade or not, for the only master known to Awka people was the master craftsman, the Nne Uzu.

In modern times Awka has adapted to the republican system and is currently divided into two local government areas, Awka North and Awka South with local representatives. However, it still preserves traditional systems of governance with the respected Ozo titled men often consulted for village and community issues and a paramount cultural representative, the Eze Uzu who is elected by all Ozo titled men by rotation amongst different villages to represent the city at state functions.

The current Eze Uzu of the city selected since 1999 is Gibson Nwosu one of the first recruits for the Nigerian Air force and a former head of Air Traffic Operations for the Biafra Air Force, the Lusaka International Airport and the Zambian Air Service Training Institute (ZASTI).

Awka should not be confused with Awka-Etiti which is a town in Idemili South local government area that is often mistaken for the main capital.[4] Today it is the capital of Anambra state of Nigeria. Slogan: Sires of Smiths
Prof. Philip Emeagwali

Prof. Philip Emeagwali

 Awkuzu

Awkuzu is divided into three main parts: Ezi, Ifite and Ikenga sections according to seniority or birth order. Like most Eri-Awka towns of Igboland, each section is further divided into sub-villages.
  • Ezi has Iru-Anyika, Aka-Ezi, Igbu and Ozu.
  • Ifite section is made up of Amabo, Isioji, and Ifite-Umueri.
  • Ikenga has Ezi-Nkwo, Nkwelle-Awkuzu, Umuobi, Ukpomachi and Dusogu.
As a community, Awkuzu is famed for its large population which gave it the sobriquet as "Ibilibe Ogada" (the locust swarming fame), a title that steamed from 'glorified' local disputes with neighbors but now attached to the traditional stool.

Traditional Leadership

The origin of common leadership in Awkuzu predates the colonialists' entry into the Niger Delta and Igbo heartland in the 1800s. First, the people have had recognized primateship religious priesthood authority which was exercised by the Eze Ana who holds the Ofo-Awkuzu. Until about the 1700, when one of her powerful men, Mgbako was initiated into the Ozo-Atulu-Ukpa-Okala by his Umunya warrior friend, Igboegbunam Odezuluigbo (who himself received the title at Nri Anaocha), the priest of Ana provided political adjudicature as well as religious headship.[citation needed]
The title the traditional prime minister of Awkuzu is called "Nnamenyi" which was given to Late Chief Anaegboka Odife in the 1970s. He was succeeded by Chief Ogamba and later by the Late Obi John Ejikeme Nebeolisa.

The title of the traditional ruler of Awkuzu is called "EZE AWKUZU". this title is reserved for the heirs to the Ibilibe Ogada throne; the Aganama royal family of Awkuzu. The Nnamenyi title is only a chieftaincy title created by the Anambra state government for political and administrative purposes for communities in the state who did not have Royal Thrones. This goes to explain that the traditional rulership of Awkuzu 'EZE AWKUZU' is hereditary while the Nnamenyi, Igwe, Obi and other like titles can be given to anybody. Obi John Ejikeme Nnebolisa never was enthroned on the Nnamenyi Chieftaincy line as that title was fraudlently brought into Awkuzu by mischief makers for which they paid dearly for that sacrilege. Obi John Ejikeme Nnebolisa was rightfully and traditionally enthroned as "OBI NA EJELU EZE OZI" by the EZE of Awkuzu EZE AGANAMA who died years ago. Making the throne vacant as I write.
Other Key figures in Awkuzu include Late Chief Paul Ike Ogbogu, late Ichie J.N.A Nnanweuba and Dr. Chira. Both of whom contributed immensely to the success of the town.
https://i2.wp.com/obindigbo.com.ng/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Dr.-Charles-Keahalam-2.png 
Charles Chinedu Okeahalam
Oba is made up of nine villages- Urueze, Umu-ogali, Isu, Okuzu, Umueze (Formerly Ogwugwu), Aboime, Ifite (formerly Ogboenwe), Aboji and
Ezele.Oba history trace back to Oba Ezechidebelu Okehi as the man from whom Oba town descended. Oba Okehi had two nine sons, each of which is the progenitor of the village named after him. Beyond the history Oba Okehi, little is known. There are two prevailing legends regarding the parentage and origin of Oba Okehi. One has it that a giant bird gave birth to Oba Okehi and another holds that the giant bird brought Oba Okehi to the present settlement without parental claim.Oba is renowned for it fresh palm wine production. There are two major variations of wine produced in Oba. They are Nkwu- produced from palm trees grown in-land and Ngwo- produced from palms grown in the wetlands. The wines of Oba are known
across the country as "Ife-di-n'Oba". Oba is also known for rich educational heritage. It is home to Merchants of Light School, one of the oldest and most respected high schools in Igboland. Oba also produced the second University graduate in all of Igboland after the late Dr. Alvan Ikoku, in the person of Chief Dr. Enoch Ifediora Oli, the first Ide -Oba. Dr. Oli established Eastern Nigeria's privately owned High School, Merchants of Light School in 1946.Oba has four major High Schools - Merchants of Light, Girls' secondary school, A science High school and a privately owned High School There are 20 Primary schools and One tertiary vocational institution, Gruntvig Institute that is partly funded through Danish government aid program. At present, Gruntvig Institute offers degrees of the Delta State University in specialty courses.
Oba is gradually transforming into an international market city. Currently, there is a modern market built through community effort. A new international market is under construction. The project is being funded by three market associations: Electronic spare parts, Electronics sets & appliances
and General Electric goods is nearing completion. The Government of Anambra State is also funding the construction of yet another international market in Oba.

Founder & Geneology of Obosi

Adike, the founder of Obosi, was the son of Okpala who had other sons who were permanently resided in Ojoto. For this relationship he is still known and referred to as Adike-Okpala. One of the grandsons of Adike was also named Okpala. Listed below is the genealogy of Adike. Okpala, Ezeani and Okpo are the first sons of the first son of Adike named Oba. Ota, Ura, Makum, Uruowulu, Ugama and ire are the sons of Adike’s son named Okudu. In addition to these nine descendants of Adike, another family (named Chima) came from the western side of the river Niger to settle at Obosi. Amongst these ten families, six of them namely; Ota, Umuru, Okpala, Ezeani, Okpo and Chima formed one quarter now known as Umuota meaning the Ota’s children while remaining four, MAkum, Ugama, Uruwulu and Ire each formed a quarter.

The Five main Villages
Obosi comprises 5 quarters or villages, namely Umuota, Ire, Ugamuma, Mmakwum and Urowulu. Umuota is home to the extended kinship of okwasala &ezeagu (meaning children of King shime). King shime was a grandson of adike who migrated from Alo to the west, setting up settlements including Ojoto, the town just souteast of Obosi. As such the Kings of Obosi are drawn from Umuota in two rotating royal families.Obosi was formally spelled Abutshi.

Obosi Kingship
One of the great Kings of Obosi was Igwe (King) Iweka I who ruled in the early 20th Century. He constructed the Iweka Road stretching from Obosi to Onitsha and ending at the banks of the River Niger. Several landmarks in Onitsha, such as Iweka Road, Iweka Halt and Upper Iweka are named after him. One of his successors was his first son, Isaac, who was crowned, Igwe Iweka II, in the early 1970s. The current King is Igwe Nwakobi.

HISTORY OF ULI
Uli was established at about the 11th century. History has it that Achara, the son of Obidi (from Idemili local government of Anambra state) begat sons amongst whom was Uli. It is said that the initial abode of Uli is the Nkwo Ogbe market which was named after his son Ogbe. Other migrants joined him, prominent among them are Ogidi, Ezi and Ihite. Uli is bounded in the north by Ihiala, Amorka in the south, Ubulisiuzor in the east and Ogwu anicha in the west Ogbaru local government of Anambra state. Uli Shares common boundary with the following towns; Ihiala (N), Amorka (S), Ubulisiuzor (E) and Ogbu anicha (W) in Ogbaru local government of Anambra state.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=416432805108538&id=415563748528777

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala
 Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala
UMUEZE
The Umueze kindred are the descendants of Okpalaekwechi, a celebrated warrior and mercenary from Ohafia in the present Abia State; who was hired by people throughout the length and breath of Nigeriato help them wage wars against their enemies.

During one of such assignments with the Oni-Kakanfo, King of Oyo Kingdom then from the Western States. He traveled with his private army under moon light and had a stop – over at were the existing village then. This villages resisted the stay of Okpalaekwechi within their midst, but was only allowed after pleading with them that he had not come there to settle permanently since he was going for war. He suffered a serious defeat in that war. It was customary in those days that if you were defeated in a war, you would not come back home a life. The alternative was commit suicide, when Okpalekwechi finally returned from war he decided to settle down at Adanwebe instead of going back to Ohafia to commit suicide.

The hostility started again, which made Okpalaekwechi to marry from Ndi-Idide Village. He had four children from that marriage, namely Okpaeri, Umueri, Oguluwa and Nzeafia. Meanwhile the Ezimezi people started their own unfriendly attitude again while Ndi-idide is now protecting him as their son-inlaw.

In order to appease Ezimezi, he decided to marry one of them as his second wife, who later gave birth to another son called Ezenagum.

The love Okpalaekwechi had for Ezenagum attracted bad-blood amongst his siblings from his father’s first wife, who started planning how to eliminate him. However, Ezenagum who managed to survive under the tutelage of his father, with the establishment of Okpalaekwechi’s family, Adabebe Village came into being. On the death of Okpalaekwe; there was an intensive search for twenty human heads with which to bury him, according to the customs and traditions of the land. Thus came an opportunity for the brothers of Ezenagum to carry out their diabolical plans of eliminating him. But this was not be, as his mother and her brothers immediately put heads together and moved the small boy to Ezimezi being their own home. This was where the he remained till the end of his father’s burial ceremony. When he became of age, his maternal uncles (ie Nnaochie) again took him to his siblings at Adabebe and requested that their nephew be given a piece of land to build his own house. His siblings immediately held a meeting and decided to give him an evil forest (Ofia Ababa) which belonged to Nawgu people. Ezenagum’s uncles rejected and subsequently prepared their sister’s son with a powerful pot which they asked him to carry on approaching the evil forest; and with further instruction to him that whenever the port fell would be the place for him to settle. The pot fell at the present Obu-Eze-Akaa complex and this was where he built his own house out of the fact that his siblings might attack him, he was being guarded by some warrious from Ezimezi.

- See more at: http://amawbiaugbogiliga.org/History%20of%20Umueze%20Village.htm#sthash.bvXq4TRA.dpuf

achebe 
Chinue Achebe

Adazi-Ani is one of the towns in Anaocha Local Government Area of Anambra State. It is located along Nnewi/Agulu Road. It has borders with Nnokwa, Alor, and Oraukwu towns in Idemili South Local Government Area and with Neni, and Adazi-Enu in Anaocha Local Government Area. The villages in Adazi-Ani are in zones. The zones are Asano, Umuru,, and Ede. In Asano Zone there are Eziora, Ikenga, and Umuogu villages. In Umuru Zone there are Amaeku, Dimnam, and Osioka villages. In Ede Zone there are Ezi-Etiti, Uhuezeama, Uhuotulu, and Urunkwo villages. There are altogether ten villages. Adazi-Ani has an area estimated 16 square kilometers.

Adazi- Ani is an autonomous community like every other town in Okotu clan. Adazi-Ani is one of the sons of an ancient warrior whose name was OKUTU from Umuona. After numerous conquests Okotu moved downwards and settled at Okonobi in Adazi-Enu. He married two wives. His first wife had three male children whose names in order of their birth were Adazi-Enu, Adazi-Ani, and Adazi-Nnukwu. The male children of Okotu by his second wife were Ichida, Amichi, Osumenyi, Ogbodi, and Ikenga. There were movements of the sons of Okotu to find plots of land for settlement. Adazi-Ani moved southwards and settled at a place which today is called Adazi-Enu, however, did not move out from Obi Okotu in Adazi-Enu.
http://www.adazi-ani.org/history.html 
Around the early twelfth century a man named IJIKALA was known to have founded Okoh. He was a renowned farmer. In addition to farming, he was known to be a good hunter. He engaged in hunting mostly after planting season and before crops were ready for harvest. During these periods, food was usually scarce and there was always need to look for other food sources beside farm crops. His actual residence is still known within an area known as AMAIJIKALA along Ogulugu road, in Ezioko village.

Okoh is particularly famous for several reasons;

It produced the first executive vice president of Nigeria in the person of His Excellency Chief(Dr.) Alex Ifeanyichukwu Ekwueme; the IDEOKO.
Okoh is also renowned for its industrial sector. The first mechanized palm oil processing factory in Aguata District was established in Okoh in 1927 by Chief John Ifeakor, behind the present St Peter’s Catholic Church and popularly known as Akwu-Igwe. Other industries exist.
Okoh also hosts the first polytechnic in Anambra State, Nigeria; Federal polytechnic, Okoh.
The traditional head is called The Igwe, Eze Ijikala. The present occupant of the stool is Professor Lazarus Edward Nnanyelu Ekwueme, Nnanyelugo Ogbonnaya Nwovuegbe, Ekwueme IV, Ozioko Eze Ijikala II. He is a Professor Emeritus of Music, University of Lagos. Okoh Peoples Union (OPU) is a democratic body with full constituent powers charged with the responsibility of the day-to-day running and political administration of Okoh. Chief (Dr.) Alex Ekwueme is the IDEOKO and the grand patron for life of OPU. Okoh Peoples Forum can also be found on the Facebook. Okoh was once the headquarters of the defunct Aho-Mili Local Government in the early nineties when it was caved out of Orumba North Local Government Area. Educationally, the town hosts a federal Polytechnic, many secondary and primary schools. The town has also produced many clergies including two Bishops.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okoh_Town 
Akwaeze is one of the ancient autonomous communities (town) of Igbo land. The town was
founded by the first son, Ezennebo called Akwa. Akwaeze is one of the ten towns that make up Anaocha Local Government Area of Anambra State of Nigeria. Akwaeze, Neni, Obeledu and other Akwas towns are said to be of the same parent – Ezennebo. They are called “IBE NNE”.

Location

Geographically, it is bordered at East by Aguluzigbo town, at West by Neni and Adazi-Enu town, at North by Obeledu town and at South by Oraeri town. Igbo-ukwu – Adazi-Nnukwu road passes through Akwaeze.
http://ezeanidikefoundation.org/index.php/about-us/brief-history-of-akwaeze


Historical Survey OF Ogbunike

a) Iguedo & Umu-Iguedo clan

Ogbunike belongs to Umu-Iguedo clan. There is no dispute about this in history. Until recently the indigenes of the town participated in the olili-nne-Iguedo and they usually sent their offering to the traditional priest of Nando.

Iguedo, a woman, is widely regarded aetiologically as the mother of the Umu-Iguedo clan. There are divergent opinions on this. No position can be outrightly and correctly accepted or rejected, as some of the data came purely through oral tradition and scanty archaeological discoveries. But there is near unanimity in different parts of the area of our studies concerning the strong connection between an individual person called Iguedo and the towns that constitute Umu-Iguedo clan.

One of the entries on the clan reads:

The people of this clan are intelligent but headstrong, and social progress has, owing to Nri influence, got beyond the system of rule by the oldest men.
b) Who is Iguedo?
One opinion holds that she was a daughter of Eri. The origin and the life of Eri himself have been mythicized. By A.D. 994 he had existed. He came down from the sky, God sent him. He canoed down the River Anambra and established a place known as Eri-Aka. He had two wives. The first bore five children: Agulu (founder of Aguleri); Nri Ifiakuanim; Nri Onugu (founder of Igbariam); Ogbodudu (the founder of Amanuke); and a daughter, Iguedo, who bore the founders of Ogbunike, Awkuzu, Umuleri and Nando. The second wife, Oboli, gave birth to Onoju who left the Anambra area and became the founder of Igala land.

Another opinion asserts that Iguedo came from either Agukwu or Onitsha. Not many people share this view. That Iguedo came from Agukwu (Nri) could be an attempt to explain her relationship with the people of Nri. If she is said to have come from Onitsha, that may again be an effort to account for the profound respect which some parts of Onitsha accord her. It was very well known that olili-nne-Iguedo was celebrated by some Onitsha indigenes.

Iguedo’s relationship with the people of Onitsha is further supported and explained. In the letter to the Resident, Onitsha Province, dated 12th October, 1932, the people of Onitsha were counted among the children of Iguedo. The signatories to the letter, on behalf of the people of Ogbunike, insisted that Onitsha was the daughter of Iguedo. The District Officer for Onitsha later in his letter of 29th November, 1932, clarified:

The Umuigwedo (sic) Towns certainly have an Onitsha relationship —but with only one quarter thereof— that is, OGBOLI. It would not be practicable to divorce OGBOLI from the rest of Onitsha and I do not think that Mr Bridges has recommended this. OGBOLI has far closer affinities with the rest of Onitsha.
According to oral tradition, the progenitors of the towns of Umu-Iguedo clan were born out of successive marriages of Iguedo to several men. She first married Nnamenyi and gave birth to Ogbunike, Awkuzu and Ogboli. Later, she got married to Riam (or Osodi) from Nri, and the fruit of their marriage was Eri (progenitor of Umuleri). Finally, Nnamovo, a man who was believed to have come from Onitsha married Iguedo and she gave birth to Nando. It was in the land founded by Nando that Iguedo died and was buried. For this reason, the descendants of Iguedo made, until recently, a yearly pilgrimage (olili-nne-Iguedo) to her death place which has become a shrine.
c) Why Iguedo?

http://ogbunike.blogspot.com/2009/11/ogbunike-holycave-town.html

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

                                                             Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


Awofia according to common oral tradition was the founder of Amawbia. The town has six surviving villages: Umueze, Ngene, Adabebe, Umukabia, Ezimezi and Enu-oji. From time immemorial, Amawbia had been an automatons community, managing its own affairs. Beginning from 1905, Amawbia had been the seat of government for the former Awka District, the former Njikoka Local Government, and presently, Awka Local Government.

- See more at: http://amawbiaugbogiliga.org/Brief%20History%20of%20Amawbia%20Town.htm#sthash.9z19E5PH.dpuf
http://amawbiaugbogiliga.org/Brief%20History%20of%20Amawbia%20Town.htm


ABOUT NIMO

Nimo was one of the most thickly populated Communities in the then Awka Division of 82 towns and now the second most thickly populated town in Njikoka Local Government Area. Nimo is 1 out of the 177 towns in Anambra state. Politically, Nimo has 4 wards.

Owelle, from whom Nimo got her creation, is the eponymous father of Nimo, Abagana, Eziowelle and Abba. Nimo had four children namely, Okpala Dinwenu (Etiti Nimo) Ezenebo (Ifiteani), Ojideleke (Egbengwu), and Ezeabani (Ifitenu). She was earlier ruled by four Ezes (Chiefs), one for each quarter of Nimo. Nimo was notably known as an agricultural town and consequently produced bountiful economic commercial commodities.

Praise worthily and courageously, Nimo met with many inter-community wars against Ozalla, Ezike, Okpo, Owa, etc. and relentlessly defeated the combatants with indomitable might. Because of their strategy and method of fighting, they were called "Ndi ofulu uzo ma fa anua muo".

ERA OF THE WHITE MAN::

In the bid for the British to consolidate Colonial rule in Nimo, the White Man first settled at the part of Nimo called Oliakwukwo from where he requested the Nimo Community to present a person who would serve as a Warrant Chief. In compliance with this demand, Ogbuefi Analikwu of Egbenwgu Nimo was unanimously presented to the White Man as their Eze (Chief). Analikwu was accordingly offered a Warrant. He was reputed to be the first Nimo citizen to plant the Orange tree in the town. For the first time, Nimo had a single leader who operated under the close supervision of the White Man as was their system of colonial governance.

When Analikwu died, his son Muoka succeeded him. This created an opportunity for Mr Ibekwe of Egbengwu to take up the Chieftaincy position.

A period of stalemate and confusion followed, as the other Ndi Eze for the four quarters - Akunatu Nwaelom and Okafor Oji Agbakwuogu (for Etiti Nimo), Obiwelozor and Aro Ezeamii (for Ifitenu) struggled for recognition. Later, sanity prevailed an the stalemate was resolved by the popular selection of Achuamaokwa Onyiuke as the second Warrant Chief to be presented to the White Man for recognition by the people of Nimo.

In order to prevent further claims by the other contestants listed earlier, and in order to maintain peace and stability in Nimo, there was an invocation of a general oath (Itu Iyi) that henceforth, Nimo would endorse only one Chief at a time. The general oath was later revoked when the colonial administration established a Native Court in Nimo and it became necessary to have more Chiefs who would help in the adjudication of cases.

Achuamaokwa Onyiuke ruled for some time without open confrontation with his former colleagues. He was not a harsh ruler and was liked by the people. As age began to tell on him, he presented his son, Michael Onyiuke, to Nimo for consideration as his successor in his life time.

Michael Onyiuke was accordingly, unanimously, accepted by Nimo as the third Chief of Nimo after Analikwu and Achuamaokwa. He rule magnanimously and contributed immensely in checking robbery and forceful snatching of peoples' belongings (Mpu) which was then rampant and which was spearheaded by the unrecognised contestants to the chieftaincy. His affability and humane disposition earned him the appellation, "Master".

When Michael Muoyekwu Onyiuke died in April 1937, he was mourned by the entire town. To the people, the death of Muoyekwu Onyiuke was an irreparable loss. He was later succeeded by his brother, Alfred Nkwocha Onyiuke, who took the Chieftaincy title of Owelle III. As a devoted, conscientious, enthusiastic, patriotic and humble ruler. Chief Alfred Onyiuke enjoyed the massive support of the people of Nimo. During his reign, many developmental projects were initiated and executed satisfactorily in Nimo.

Nimo was however blessed early enough with the inauguration of a town union known and called Nimo Brotherhood Society (N.B.S.) at Lagos under the able leadership of the late Chief F.C. Onyiuke and other enthusiastic patriots in 1932.

Consequent upon this noble action, the Society carried its fame to many towns in the North, South, East, West and Central parts of Nigeria where Nimo people inhabited and was inaugurated. The birth of N.B.S. in Nimo, inevitably made civilisation widespread in the community as the headquarters of the society was based at Nimo.

As a result of this innovation, the leaders of N.B.S. embarked on community development projects like building of primary schools, post office, road construction, electrification of Nimo, building of secondary schools, market stalls, town halls, rural automatic telephone exchange, pipe-borne water supply, health centre, hospitals, etc; all achieved through devoted communal efforts.

http://nbsamericasinc.org/facts.html 
Umunya is an Olu Community in the present day Anambra State, Nigeria. It is a town of ten villages namely Ezi-Umunya, Okpu, Ojobi, Umuebo, Amaezike, Ajakpani, Odumodu-Ani, Isioye, Odumodu-Enu and Ukunu. These villages are sub-grouped into Ezi, Ifite and Ikenga sub-divisions, the tri-partite heritage of all Gadite H/Igbos commonly referred to in anthropological history as ERI-AWKA Igbo.
Geographically, Umunya is at the center of today’s Anambra State and is located within the coordinates of N06 11 11 E06 24 54. Umunya is bounded in the East by Ogbunike; in the West by Awkuzu (correctly spelled as “OKUZU”). In the North Umunya is bounded by Nteje and Nkwelle- Ezunaka and with Ifite-Dunu and Umudioka in the South.
Mythical and Related History: The founder of Umunya is called Nya who was the son in-charge of the fleets of ERU, the progenitor of the Igbos of Guinea Forest West Africa. The story had it that River Omambala was joined by Isi-Ogwugwu, a fast flowing river that then encompassed the present Umunya area. Isi-Ogwugwu was believed to have created the rolling topography nature of the area as it is today. The scenic depression of Urunda towards Ogbunike is commonly cited by story-tellers, to credit this myth.
The story goes that on a certain Eke day as Nya was ferrying fishermen and farmers across the stupendous Isi-Ogwugwu water course, he was struck by a moving flash in the river that followed an unusual wave swirl. The remarkable nature of the 'whirl and twirl' of the flash made Nya to suspend work in reverence to a river goddess, whom he believed was passing to Eke market, in the west. As he went out to rest, he was shown a vision of a stone upon which he will establish a community of farmers who will become his own people. When he woke up, he discovered that the river had receded further beyond where he tied his canoe. This he took as a confirmation of his dream. He therefore settled here at the place known as "Ilo-Umuebo". This Ilo-Umuebo is now the center-court of High Justice in Umunya, where truth must be told. He brought his kinsmen and friends and founded the community known today as Umunya (UMU NNYA, i.e. “Children of Nnya”). His little group farmed the yam specie then called “nnya-ji” a name that seem to agree with a later yellow type of yam, JI-ONA (probably, a variant of dascorea Japonica). Again, the name of the oldest age organization - actually an elders forum called OJI ANA also suggest the statement, “O’ Ji Ona” (it is the Ona yam).
The stone which is called "Mkpume Mmili" has several depression points which portend “many good or ill” for the people. The points are different sizes and each village size can easily see which depression represent it. To the consistency of the Mkpume-Mmili myth, the depressions were originally nine in number to assert Nine Villages for the town. But in the early 1970s, when a disagreement arose in the Ikenga on how it will be represented in the homage to the new Traditional Ruler (then Igwe J.C Menakaya), the case drew arguments for and against the constituents of Ikenga (Odumodu-Ani and Odumodu-Enu). According to Ogbuanyinya Igboegbunam Onenulu II (1886-1984), head of the apical Ozo Tradition, when the town gathered at Ilo-Umuebo for final arbitration on the matter, “behold two giant vultures perched on the Ogbu Tree and came down at the centre of the square!” then on his on his feet to address the town, Igboegbunam pointed to the “messengers of the gods”(because they both had rings on the legs) and asked the gathering, “Is there anybody here who is still doubtful about Odumodu and the truth that there are in fact two communities in Ikenga Umunya and not one? If there is such person or persons, let him stand up to state so! There was absolute silence followed by a loud unanimity of “ODUMODU DI IBUA … ODUMODU DI IBUA” (Odumodu is two … Odumodu is two) from the people. And so it was decided”. In 1973, during the coronation ceremony & the homage, they were differently represented. Subsequently, it was discovered at the Mkpume-Mmili that one big depression has divided, even with a third thinly budding! To this day, whenever any additional depression or depressions occur or starts to occur, it is viewed with mixed feelings. For the elders and some community watchers, it is a sign of division among the people. Usually, such discovery would be reported to the Oji-Ana forum where issues of grave traditional importance are treated. Propitiation of various kinds often suffices to appease Ana, the land goddess.
This Mkpume-Mmili stone can still be seen at Ugwu-Nche in the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Annex compound, by 'Olii' water-log.

http://wikimapia.org/7778683/Umunya

The founding of Ekwulumili is steeped in antiquity. The legend of its immediate origins was relayed in the Nigerian Supreme Court judgment in the case of Ogbuokwelu vs. Umeanafunkwa, (1994) 4 N.W.L.R. 676; a land dispute between Urueze Village, Ekwulumili and the neighboring town of Unubi. The court testimony recounted that the founder of Ekwulumili, named Ekwulu was a Shepard and farmer from Agukwu, Nri, in Njikoka local government area, further north of Ekwulumili who was in search of greener pastures. He settled in a location with seven streams and a great pond (the present location of Ekwulumili). He eventually bore four sons who founded the current four villages that constitute the town. The villages are Owelengwu (now renamed Owelechukwu), Isigwu, Urueze and Umudim.

http://www.ekwulumili.com

In Nnewi oral history and mythology, the 'ewi' (Igbo: bush rat) played a great role in saving the founders of Nnewi during wars. Throughout its history, Nnewi has used its military might to maintain its borders and because of this, the killing or eating of ewi in Nnewi is forbidden to the present day. Nnewi existed as an independent kingdom from the 15th century to 1904, when British colonial administration occupied the kingdom.

Nnewi kingdom was founded on four quarters (large villages), namely Otolo, Uruagu, Umudim, and Nnewichi. Each village was divided into family units called 'umunna'. Each umunna had a first family known as the 'obi'.[7]

These four quarters were these original names of the Sons of Edo: Otolo being the elderest and Nnewichi being the youngest of the sons.Obi of Nnewi

The Place of Nnewi in Igbo History

Originally when the Igbos or Ibos settled in the present day Eastern Nigeria, they arrived with three leader two were spiritual leaders and the youngest of the three a hereditary King known as Obi a King by birthright. The first was the Eze Nri of Awka a Priest King, the second the Eze Aro of Arochukwu a Priest King and the third the Obi of Nnewi a political and war ruler. The Obi Nnewi enthroned the Obi of Onitsha as an Obi an upgrade from is former title Eze of Onitsha in the 1740s. The Obi of Onitsha was well qualified to become an Obi being disputably the first among the two sons of the Oba of Benin. The Onitsha people are visitors and later settlers in Igbo land. The Aros know this history (Nnewi being a relation and a leader among the Igbos) and this part of the reason there are no Aro settlements in Nnewi. The Obi of Nnewi Obi Okoli in1780s lost his stool when inside palace politics that hinged on tradition edged him out. Traditional royal law had it that the Crown Prince must perform the funeral rights of the late Obi before he can be crowned, Obi Okoli was absent and arrived home only after the late Obi Okoli 1st was buried. His Uncle (The late Obi Okoli the 1st younger brother) performed the funeral rights in his stead and took over as Igwe Nnewi he could not be enthroned as an Obi (which means the first son). The Obi Okoli royal linage was forced into exile, they got refuge at Umune-Alam in Umudim, Nnewi where they still are to this day. The Obi Okoli family still bears the Ofor Nnewi till this day.

Edo is the supreme deity of all the Alusi (Igbo: deity) in the Anaedo country. The central shrine of this unifying Alusi is at Nkwo Nnewi, the central Market. There are four other deities in Nnewi: Ana, Ezemewi, Eze and Ele. Christianity was introduced by the Europeans in 1885 and many Nnewi people now practise Christianity. Nnewi, Ichi and Oraifite made up the Anaedo state. Anaedo communities have common ancestries, beliefs and traditional value systems. Nnewi is a major trading and manufacturing centre in Nigeria. Due to its high commercial activities, the city has attracted millions of migrants from other states and countries.

The Ofala Nnewi is a cultural festival held every year to celebrate the coronation of the Igwe of Nnewi. Afiaolu (New yam festival) and Ikwuaru are also among traditional festivals held annually in Nnewi. Nnewi Kingdom is also known as Anaedo meaning the Land of Gold (The supreme deity and goddess of Nnewi).In Nnewi oral history and mythology, the 'ewi' (Igbo: bush rat) played a great role in saving the founders of Nnewi during wars. Throughout its history, Nnewi has used its military might to maintain its borders and because of this, the killing or eating of ewi in Nnewi is forbidden to the present day. Nnewi existed as an independent kingdom from the 15th century to 1904, when British colonial administration occupied the kingdom.

Nnewi kingdom was founded on four quarters (large villages), namely Otolo, Uruagu, Umudim, and Nnewichi. Each village was divided into family units called 'umunna'. Each umunna had a first family known as the 'obi'.[7]

These four quarters were these original names of the Sons of Edo: Otolo being the elderest and Nnewichi being the youngest of the sons.Obi of Nnewi

The Place of Nnewi in Igbo History

Originally when the Igbos or Ibos settled in the present day Eastern Nigeria, they arrived with three leader two were spiritual leaders and the youngest of the three a hereditary King known as Obi a King by birthright. The first was the Eze Nri of Awka a Priest King, the second the Eze Aro of Arochukwu a Priest King and the third the Obi of Nnewi a political and war ruler. The Obi Nnewi enthroned the Obi of Onitsha as an Obi an upgrade from is former title Eze of Onitsha in the 1740s. The Obi of Onitsha was well qualified to become an Obi being disputably the first among the two sons of the Oba of Benin. The Onitsha people are visitors and later settlers in Igbo land. The Aros know this history (Nnewi being a relation and a leader among the Igbos) and this part of the reason there are no Aro settlements in Nnewi. The Obi of Nnewi Obi Okoli in1780s lost his stool when inside palace politics that hinged on tradition edged him out. Traditional royal law had it that the Crown Prince must perform the funeral rights of the late Obi before he can be crowned, Obi Okoli was absent and arrived home only after the late Obi Okoli 1st was buried. His Uncle (The late Obi Okoli the 1st younger brother) performed the funeral rights in his stead and took over as Igwe Nnewi he could not be enthroned as an Obi (which means the first son). The Obi Okoli royal linage was forced into exile, they got refuge at Umune-Alam in Umudim, Nnewi where they still are to this day. The Obi Okoli family still bears the Ofor Nnewi till this day.

Edo is the supreme deity of all the Alusi (Igbo: deity) in the Anaedo country. The central shrine of this unifying Alusi is at Nkwo Nnewi, the central Market. There are four other deities in Nnewi: Ana, Ezemewi, Eze and Ele. Christianity was introduced by the Europeans in 1885 and many Nnewi people now practise Christianity. Nnewi, Ichi and Oraifite made up the Anaedo state. Anaedo communities have common ancestries, beliefs and traditional value systems. Nnewi is a major trading and manufacturing centre in Nigeria. Due to its high commercial activities, the city has attracted millions of migrants from other states and countries.

The Ofala Nnewi is a cultural festival held every year to celebrate the coronation of the Igwe of Nnewi. Afiaolu (New yam festival) and Ikwuaru are also among traditional festivals held annually in Nnewi. Nnewi Kingdom is also known as Anaedo meaning the Land of Gold (The supreme deity and goddess of Nnewi).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nnewi 
THE EARLIEST AWKA PEOPLE – ORIGIN AND HUNTING ECONOMY:

The territory known today as Awka has been inhabited by man for several centuries, perhaps for millenia. In the 1930s, stone tools were discovered in the area which belong to the Neolithic stage of human development. It is largely because of the antiquity of man in this area that the ‘core’ Awka people do not have any memory of migration from outside the Awka area; they claim that they have been there from the beginning of time! These first Awka people lived on the banks of the Ogwugwu stream in what is now the Nkwelle ward/village in Awka. How they got there, who their migratory leaders were, whence they came, are all lost in the haze of remote history. We do know that these earliest people consisted of three kin groups – Urueri, Amaenyiana and Okpo – and were collectively called the Ifiteana. ‘Ifiteana’ roughly translates into “[people who] sprouted from the earth”.

The Ifiteana people (i.e., the Old Awka people) were a settled agricultural society. However, big-game hunting constituted a very important sector of their economy. The elephant was their most prized game; its tusk was a very valuable article of trade.

The Ifiteanas already knew the art of smelting iron ore and fashioning the implements of farming, hunting and, of course, war. Their first and chief god was an old deity called Ọkikanube (usually shortened to Ọkanube). According to the myths of these people, Ọkanube was a supernatural being who came from the sky and taught the Ifiteana people of old the arts of working iron and making medicine. His name Ọkanube means ‘He who is Pre-eminent with the Spear’. He was basically a hunting god and the myths say he showed the people how to hunt with iron spears (ube) laced with medicine, hence his name.

The elephant tusk, called okike, was the symbol of the god Ọkanube. Every Awka compound had this important ritual symbol kept in the family chapel cum reception hall (called the obu). In the fifth month of every Awka year, (that is, towards the beginning of the dry season when hunting started), the okike was venerated and the people asked their god Ọkanube for a fruitful hunting season. The okike was brought from its sacred hiding place and unwrapped. A goat or a chicken was sacrificed and buried in a hole in front of this symbol. Then the okike was re-wrapped and taken back to its sanctum. It won’t be seen again until the next hunting season; it was believed that whoever set eyes on okike before the fifth month was struck with madness.

In the hollow of the sacred elephant tusk, the people stored their hunting ‘medicine’. They smeared the ‘medicine’ on their hunting spears before they set out for the bush. This ‘medicine’ was of two types:
a) The otolo type, which caused the hunted animal (usually an elephant) to pass diarrhoeal stool, until it died of dehydration and weakness; and
b) The ada-ngene type, which aroused great thirst for water in the hunted animal. The animal would then seek for a watering-hole, but would die once it tasted water.

The Ifiteana people believed they received the recipes for both ‘medicines’ from Ọkanube himself.

Awka was once a haunt of elephants. A part of the town is still called Ama Enyi (Elephants’ Quarters), and until recently there was a pond in the town called Iyi Enyi (Elephants’ Pond) where the elephants used to gather to drink and slack their thirst. Over-hunting rendered the poor animals virtually extinct even before the coming of the British colonialists. The last elephant seen in the area was killed in 1910 by three hunters using the ada-ngene medicine.

As elephants became scarcer and scarcer, the god Ọkanube became less and less important, until people stopped worshipping him altogether. The spot where his shrine once stood is marked by a lone spear stuck in the ground. But his memory survived him worship. According to Amanke Okafor, the Ifiteanas called themselves Ụmụ Ọkanube (the children of Ọkanube) or Ụmụ Ọka; and it was from that appellation that the name of the town, Ọka (anglicized as Awka) was derived. A market was also named in Ọkanube’s honour – the Oye Ọkanube (Oye Ọka) market. The Oye Ọka market square was the centre of Awka political life, where weighty matters were deliberated on and important decisions made, until the British Government put an end to its meetings in 1928.


Umunze
The name Umunze was derived from the name of the originator "Nze" meaning the descendant of nze in about 1476 during the time of extreme drought. Nze Izo Ezema was a farmer and hunter from ohafia near Arochukwu in the present day Abia State. He wandered the forest on his normal hunting and on discovering a very fertile land full of arable crops he like it. He went back to his father and told him about his new home and also ask for wives. His father saw his behaviour and equipped him with necessities. He was given a mother shrine that has a stream known as Izo mmiri (The present Izo in the eke izo square) with two wives and a slave to the Izo. He settled first at Akpu Mgbatiri Okpa situated at Umuizo today. His wives were Lolo and Ijendu. Lolo gave birth to 7 sons and 1 daughter and ijendu had only 1 son. Nze being our Originator : Izo being his father's name in Ohafia : Ezema being the family village name in Ohafia.

Lolo gave birth to 7 sons and 1 daughter

1. Nso, the descendants formed Nsogwu

2. Ugwu- Ugwunano

3. Uragu-Lomu

4. Ishingwu-Ubaha

5. Cheke-Ururo

6. Okpontu-Ozara

7. Diala-Amuda.



Anambra State is indeed becoming the hub for industrialization and commercial activities and its indigenes are greatly infuencing the development of the local and national economy.

Our Culture! ...Our Identity!! ...

Ref: Wikipedia.com, Obindigbo.com.ng, Nairaland.com


Anambra Compendium

For More INfo Contact:

Call Emeka @ +234 803 318 5940 to be part of it!
 Like the Official Facebook Page... Click www.fb.com/AnambraCompendium
Follow on Twitter and Instagram @OurCompendium

Be Part of History... Proudly Onye Anambra!







No comments:

Post a Comment

Be Interactive, Your Comments Are Needed!

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the comment writers alone and does not reflect or represent the views of TrendyVoice

Designed by TrendyVoice